Sicilian Ceramics in Palermo

Back in the summer we dashed to Sicily to empty out our beautiful house.

 

I am heartbroken to say we can’t afford to keep it, now that we’re settled in England and paying for a home here.

If you look really carefully you can see Hubby tackling homesickness by looming over a large pot of ragu in the kitchen…

 

If anyone is interested in buying my house in Sicily have a look here, and contact me if you would like more information. (As a special offer for blog readers, I will include a free instruction manual on handling the neighbours.)

Anyway, while I was in Sicily I decided to console myself by purchasing some gorgeous Sicilian majolica ceramic art. So I toddled off to “Tre Erre” in Palermo.

 

What to buy?

An owl?

 

Something fruity?

 

Something fishy?

 

How about some heads?

 

Or even Medusa’s head?

 

In the end, I decided that what I really needed was a colossal plate. Yes, of course I have got lots of plates already, but not one like this.

Isn’t it lovely?

 

The design is the classic majolica style of the Palermo region, and one of the classics used by the artist at “Tre Erre”.

I convinced Hubby to bring the car round and linger in the middle of the main road which runs through the centre of Palermo, while the shop chappie wrapped it up very carefully. Hubby was most agitated about this, now that he has become English.

But I told him it’s fine to park anywhere, so long as you keep the engine running and put your hazard lights on. English people do that, too.

It’s the safe, modern way to inform other drivers that you are doing something illegal, but that there’s no need to worry, because you KNOW it is illegal.

 

As we slammed the car boot and sped off, we were both equally pleased.

I was pleased with my plate, and Hubby was pleased that he could let the 325 vehicles hooting and shouting behind him resume their journeys through Palermo, and stop giving him the finger.

A great result all round.

***

If you visit Palermo and want to browse the shop, here’s their website:

Tre Erre Ceramiche, Palermo

By the way, this isn’t an advertisement for them, I don’t sell for them as an agent and I don’t import ceramics.

If you want to order anything, contact them not me!

 

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6 thoughts on “Sicilian Ceramics in Palermo

  1. Veronica is adorable and I understand why she has had to move back to blighty for health amongst other reasons. It is so sad for her that she is having to sell the old house but she will also have the great joy (as we do) of staying in other parts of Sicily and not having to worry about the upkeep anymore.
    Are the boys supporting Stoke City yet?
    X

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    1. I seem to have the only two lads in Italy who take no interest in football! Though my sister even topped that, and married the only man from Brazil who not only doesn’t care about football but also can’t dance!

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      1. This is good news Veronica because Stoke City are a bunch of thugs!
        Back to Sicily, we stayed in a place called Castell Umberto last summer, no one spoke any English and we speak very little Italian. We knew we were providing huge entertainment for the town as we tried to buy various things. You could sense they were discussing where we had been and the hilarity of our miming. The best one was trying to buy an envelope, the lady in the shop very kindly furnished us with an English/Italian dictionary! Of course they were all charming and jolly and we had a great time. Popped down to Palermo to see St Rosalie being paraded down the street, asked the local police what time she might get to the crossroads – where we were getting increasingly drunk on the two euro plastic glasses of wine – and they were amazed that we bothered to ask them because this was Palermo and how were they supposed to know! I think she arrived about midnight but it’s all a bit of a blur now!
        Good luck with house.
        All the best,
        Jane

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  2. Here in South Africa hazard lights have a different purpose. For normal sane drivers they function as – hazard lights – for taxi bus drivers they are multi purpose. It can mean – “I am turning left” or “I am turning right” – or “I am about to slam my breaks on” – or “I use these as a permanent feature to warn you that I may perform all manner of illegal manoeuvres without warning, only I have warned you because my hazard lights are on”.

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